Employee perks are essential. Without the right benefits, it’s almost impossible to attract the type of people you want to join the team. Even if you do, you may not be able to retain them once they realize the perks are below-par. 

However, it’s easy to fall into the trap of creating vague, general benefits that don’t suit anybody. Sure, health insurance is great if they don’t already pay for a separate policy. Before you create procedures to boost morale and improve productivity, you’ve got to make sure the aids are in the team’s interest.

Here are four ways to make it happen.

Add Value & Solve Problems

Money doesn’t solve every issue. It helps, but you require a great deal of it if you’re going to have no worries whatsoever. With that in mind, you should consider not using a bonus as leverage. Employees want value, which manifests itself in many forms. They may prefer a day off, for example, as it gives them more time with their family. Some may need help preparing for holidays, so looking for company Christmas gifts such as dinner delivery is an option. You can’t cater to everybody (no pun intended), but you should try and add value whenever possible.

Listen To Their Conversations

You shouldn’t spy on people and use what they say to your advantage. Instead, keep your ears peeled when you walk into the common room or kitchen area for any tips and pointers. Workers, whether knowingly or unknowingly, will give you an insight into their likes and dislikes. Once you have the information, you can store it away and use it when the time is right. You could, for instance, overhear a group of colleagues talking about how they tried a spin class and loved it. To them, a voucher for more sessions is better than a free gym membership.

Encourage Feedback

As always, the best way to figure out what’s going on in the minds of workers is to ask. When they tell you outright, you can be sure that is what they desire. However, it’s not easy to get people to participate because filling out a survey or questionnaire isn’t compulsory. So, what are your options? You can start by targeting recruits and job applicants. Getting them to complete feedback forms as part of the interview process is a straightforward way to collate the best perks for employees and put them into circulation.

Look To Your Peers

You’re competing against businesses to attract and retain the top employees. Therefore, if you’re losing, you can analyze what your rivals are doing better. Although you shouldn’t copy their schemes outright, you should gauge what makes their perks a highlight of the job. It may be that the benefits are creative and quirky and match the company’s ethos. Perhaps there is a sense of novelty involved – business trips – that suits the core demographic. You should never be afraid to accept your weaknesses, or else you’ll never turn them into strengths.

Are you perks on point?