In life, you will negotiate at some point or another. It is a fundamental skill we must curate. It might be found in negotiating with our children the correct time for them to go to bed, or that if they eat all of their greens, they can watch their favorite cartoon. However, negotiations are also important when we’re trying to secure a higher level of salary for a new job we’re about to take.

As an entrepreneur, how can we focus on negotiations to our advantage? It’s important to level this out, because sometimes negotiating too hard on our own behalf can leave other parties feeling shortchanged, and that’s no way to build a connection or to practice sustainable networking.

So, how can we negotiate with more grace? In this sense, grace is defined as ‘more aptitude, more strength, and more wit.’ Negotiating with grace means finding the best possible option at all times, without fear, and without seeming overly aggressive. Negotiations can come in any size, even if applying for a business loan you truly need, available here.

In these few tidbits of advice, you’ll no doubt see the clear path forward, and the method that will work for you:

Consider What The Other Party Needs

Consider what the other party may wish for. This helps you understand what they’re hoping for, and that gives you more room to maneuvre. Negotiations are much more successful when both parties stand to gain. Measure how much you’re willing to give in the negotiation, and always offer them less. Then, you have buffer room to come closer to that which you’re willing to provide. They will no doubt be doing the same. However, this only works if you keep one golden point in mind:

Never Be TOO Agreeable

Never be TOO agreeable. People-pleasers and those with friendly dispositions can often find themselves arguing on behalf of the other person, not wanting to sully the friendship by ‘winning too much.’ Don’t think like this. If you’re usually agreeable, that’s a skill you have to unlearn. Negotiations should always be orbited around you as the primary communicator. This helps you gravitate to something that you both want, because your side of the aisle is pulling its weight also. Be clear, and have your boundaries. This will help you give what little agreeableness you do show all the added import.

Find Common Ground

Find common ground you can begin to consider. For instance, it might be that you’re negotiating with someone at work. Perhaps you both have a great idea that you’re pushing, but only one can make the cut. It could be that you take elements from both, or consider what priorities you share. This can help you objectively weigh up which is the best move forward, and how you can share the credit. This might or might not help, but it’s a start, and it puts you on an even playing field to begin your discussions. A good negotiation is teamwork, after all, and not a war.

With this advice, we hope you can more easily negotiate with grace, confidence, and wit.