Where did the world’s wealthiest graduates study?

While there are many famous examples of business leaders and entrepreneurs who hit the big time despite dropping out or not gaining any higher education at all, most of the world’s mega wealthy attained a degree of some sort. Now, thanks to this interesting data visualization from findcourses.co.uk we can see which colleges and nations produced the world’s wealthiest graduates, as featured in the Forbes billionaire index.

Leaving home to earn a degree is a bold and often expensive choice. With such an undertaking, many prospective students understandably have one eye on what the future holds for them once they leave college. Where they will work, what their role will be and how much they might earn after graduation are all big factors when choosing a study destination. But what better way to get inspired and guide your decision than discovering which colleges produced the most billionaires?

The encouraging news is that a diverse range of colleges churn out alumni who go on to amass huge fortunes. While some institutions tend to have a knack for this, the findings show that you don’t necessarily need to study at an Ivy League college to become a billionaire.

Some key takeaways: the US is also home to seven of the ten top colleges per billionaire grad. Harvard, as some might expect, comes out on top for the most billionaires educated, with Ivy League schools like Columbia, Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania appearing in the top ten alongside three other American schools, two Chinese schools, and a school in France.

Looking at the top 100 in its entirety, we can see more variety in the nations that are represented. Schools in China, Russia, Germany, and India all appear frequently. However, when we look at the average net worth by college, the US comes out on top again. This is mainly down to Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and current richest person in the world, attending Princeton and graduating with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science in 1986.

If there’s one key thing to consider from these findings, it’s that while where you study is important; your choice of college or country will not necessarily determine your future success. Wherever and however your education occurs, the future is in your own hands!